Bernie Sanders Humor

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I’m worried. If Crazy Bernie doesn’t win in New Hampshire, he may fade out of race.

That would be good for the country, but bad for my collection of socialism humor.

He’s already been a big contributor, and today we’re going to share more examples.

We’ll start with the socialist version of the light-bulb joke.

In other words, incentives matter.

Next, we have a depiction of what “sharing” really means in Bernie’s world.

Some may argue that this is unfair because he’s never embraced a 100 percent tax rate.

That’s true if you’re just focusing on the personal income tax. But when you add the wealth tax to the equation, there will be people paying more than 100 percent of their income to the IRS.

Our next example mocks Bernie for becoming a millionaire (owner of three homes!) while campaigning against the rich.

Chavez’s daughter certainly can relate.

I’m rather amused by this next image. Bernie got the most votes in Iowa, but appears to be getting fewer delegates. Presumably that’s one form of redistribution he doesn’t favor.

Just like 2016.

Here’s a cartoon with Bernie telling a clueless young person about freebies.

Speaking of fairy tales, don’t forget the leftist version of The Little Red Hen, the leftist version of The Little Engine that Could, and the leftist version of The Ant and the Grasshopper.

Last but not least, we have the Bernie drinking game.

Given that Bernie is promising to give away $97 trillion of other people’s money, I suspect we’ll wind up with a nation of alcoholics.

P.S. If you haven’t already OD’ed on Bernie humor, we also have:

P.P.S. Barring a big surprise, Elizabeth Warren almost surely will be out of the race after New Hampshire, so we probably won’t have any opportunity to add to our Looney-Liz collection (hereherehere, and here).

by Dan Mitchell
Daniel J. Mitchell is a public policy economist in Washington. He’s been a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute, a Senior Fellow at the Heritage Foundation, an economist for Senator Bob Packwood and the Senate Finance Committee, and a Director of Tax and Budget Policy at Citizens for a Sound Economy. His articles can be found in such publications as the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Investor’s Business Daily, and Washington Times. Mitchell holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in economics from the University of Georgia and a Ph.D. in economics from George Mason University. Original article can be viewed here.