USA is Locking & Loading: Background Checks this June is 122% more than last June!

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From the NSSF:

The July 2020 NSSF-adjusted National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) figure of 1,848,307 is an increase of 122.5 percent compared to the July 2019 NSSF-adjusted NICS figure of 830,579. For comparison, the unadjusted July 2020 FBI NICS figure 3,614,192 reflects an 80.3 percent increase from the unadjusted FBI NICS figure of 2,004,277 in July 2019.

Including this interesting information from BlackEnterprise.com

“The highest overall firearm sales increase comes from Black men and women, who show a 58.2% increase in purchases during the first six months of 2020 versus the same period last year,” wrote Jim CurcurutoNational Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) director of Research and Market Development, in his report according to AOL News. “Bottom line is that there has never been a sustained surge in firearm sales quite like what we are in the midst of.”

Groups like the Black Gun Owners Association have been said to experience a tremendous spike in interest and online traffic since the protests started. “Whether it was fear of a food shortage, lack of a grocery store, the short response times for law enforcement or whether people were just fearful they were going to be attacked, I don’t know,” said Derrick Morgan, national commander of the Black Gun Owners Association, to Politico.

Permanent Brady Permit Chart 

Brady Law 

On November 30, 1993, the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act was enacted, amending the Gun Control Act of 1968. The Brady Law imposed as an interim measure a waiting period of 5 days before a licensed importer, manufacturer, or dealer may sell, deliver, or transfer a handgun to an unlicensed individual. The waiting period applies only in states without an acceptable alternate system of conducting background checks on handgun purchasers. The interim provisions of the Brady Law became effective on February 28, 1994, and ceased to apply on November 30, 1998. While the interim provisions of the Brady Law apply only to handguns, the permanent provisions of the Brady Law apply to all firearms.

Prepared by: ATF Office of Enforcement Programs and Services

Last updated: March 3, 2020

Note: Notwithstanding the dates set forth below, permits qualify as alternatives to the background check requirements of the Brady law for no more than 5 years from the date of issuance. The permit must be valid under state law in order to qualify as a Brady alternative.

State / TerritoryQualifying Permits
AlabamaNone
AlaskaConcealed weapons permits marked NICS-Exempt
American SamoaNone
ArizonaConcealed weapons permits qualify.
ArkansasConcealed weapons permits issued on or after April 1, 1999 qualify. *
CaliforniaEntertainment Firearms Permit only
ColoradoNone
ConnecticutNone
DelawareNone *
District of ColumbiaNone *
FloridaNone *
GeorgiaGeorgia firearms licenses qualify.
GuamNone *
HawaiiPermits to acquire and licenses to carry qualify.
IdahoConcealed weapons permits qualify.
IllinoisNone
IndianaNone
IowaPermits to acquire and permits to carry concealed weapons qualify.
KansasConcealed handgun licenses issued on or after July 1, 2010 qualify as alternatives to the background check.
KentuckyConcealed Deadly Weapons License (CDW) and Judicial Special Status CDW issued on or after July 12, 2006 qualify.
LouisianaConcealed handgun permits issued on or after March 9, 2015 qualify.
MaineNone *
MarylandNone *
MassachusettsNone *
MichiganLicenses to Purchase a Pistol (LTP) are the only permits that qualify as a NICS alternative.
MinnesotaNone
MississippiLicense to carry concealed pistol or revolver issued to individuals under Miss. Stat. Ann. § 45-9-101 qualify. (NOTE: security guard permits issued under Miss. Stat. Ann. §97-37-7 do not qualify).
MissouriNone *
MontanaConcealed weapons permits qualify.
NebraskaConcealed handgun permit qualifies as an alternative. Handgun purchase certificates qualify.
NevadaConcealed carry permit issued on or after July 1, 2011, qualify.
New HampshireNone
New JerseyNone
New MexicoNone
New YorkNone
North CarolinaPermits to purchase a handgun and concealed handgun permits qualify.
North DakotaConcealed weapons permits issued on or after December 1, 1999 qualify. *
Northern Mariana IslandsNone
OhioConcealed weapons permits issued on or after March 23, 2015, qualifies as an alternative to the background check requirements.
OklahomaNone *
OregonNone *
PennsylvaniaNone
Puerto RicoNone
Rhode IslandNone
South CarolinaConcealed weapons permits qualify.
South DakotaGold Card Concealed Pistol Permits and Enhanced Permits to Carry a Concealed Pistol issued on or after January 1, 2017.
TennesseeNone
TexasConcealed weapons permits qualify.
U.S. Virgin IslandsNone
UtahConcealed weapons permits qualify.
VermontNone
VirginiaNone
WashingtonNone
West VirginiaConcealed handgun license issued on or after June 4, 2014 qualify.
WisconsinNone
WyomingConcealed weapons permits qualify.
Source: ATF

* While certain permits issued in these states prior to November 30, 1998 were “grandfathered” as Brady alternatives, none of these grandfathered permits would still be valid under State law as of November 30, 2003.

Twenty-five states currently have at least one qualified alternative permit, which means that the Brady Act allows the permit-holder, who has undergone a background check to obtain the permit, to purchase a firearm from a licensed dealer without a separate additional background check for that transfer. The number of NICS (for criminal background) checks in these states does not include these legal transfers based on qualifying permits and NSSF does not adjust for these transfers.

This year Michigan removed qualifying alternate permits usage for firearm transactions. This went into effect March 3, 2020 and obviously affected their Brady Law standing