Communism Humor

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From an economic perspective, socialism and communism are the same. They’re both based on government ownershipcentral planning, and price controls.

From a political perspective, however, there’s a difference. Communism is an authoritarian form of government, while socialism can be the outcome of the democratic process.

From a humor perspective, it’s easy (and fun) to mock the economic failure of both socialism and communism, but the jokes targeting the latter often include satire about oppression.

And you’ll see some of that in today’s column, which contains new examples of humor about communism. For instance, here’s a comparison of theory and reality (just like the last image of this column).

But communists don’t always murder people.

Sometimes, as you can see in this next example, they starve people (also the point made by this brutal tweet, and also the last two images in this post).

Next, we have pictures of three things that are associated with millions of deaths.

This next example of satire reminds me of a test where you’re supposed to identify the “one of these things is not like the others.”

Now let’s look at the communist version of Cosmopolitan (they could have picked Teen Vogue, but the disgusting morons at that magazine actually are pro-communist).

Last but not least, here’s an image that’s perfect for the Antifa crowd.

And click here if you want the economic version.

P.S. My entire collection of socialism/communism humor is here. My all-time favorite communism joke is this tweet from @fathercommunism.

by Dan Mitchell
Daniel J. Mitchell is a public policy economist in Washington. He’s been a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute, a Senior Fellow at the Heritage Foundation, an economist for Senator Bob Packwood and the Senate Finance Committee, and a Director of Tax and Budget Policy at Citizens for a Sound Economy. His articles can be found in such publications as the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Investor’s Business Daily, and Washington Times. Mitchell holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in economics from the University of Georgia and a Ph.D. in economics from George Mason University. Original article can be viewed here.