Merging Brain and Computer – What could go wrong?

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Watch Klauss Schwab and the leader of the European Union discuss The European Chips Act, ostensibly designed to bring microchip manufacturing back to Europe, but also allocates funds for investments in next generation technologies.

From: Europe already has a plan to implement a “deep digital transformation” by 2030. According to the Dutch newspaper De Tijd, research center Imec will play a key role in the European chip strategy. It makes prototypes of the smallest chips, two nanometers or smaller.

Imec performs advanced research on artificial intelligence and was awarded $750,000 twice in 2019 by the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in a machine-learning competition.

In a 2017 report, The Financial Times named Imec’s self-learning neuromorphic chip one of the fifty ideas that would change the world and was described by the newspaper as having the potential to revolutionize computing.

In 2018, Imec announced the creation of a research venture to decode dementia by creating human-specific living brain models, so called “brains-on-chips” which automate and miniaturize human stem cell manipulations. It has developed technology to generate programmable, instrumented 3D brain models with single-cell precision. The project was supported by a Collaborative Science Award of one million dollars by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. (That’s Mark’s wife.)

The plan is well advanced

“Human Augmentation – The Dawn of a New Paradigm. A strategic implications project”, published jointly by the UK Ministry of Defense, and German Federal Ministry of Defense in 2021, the notion of human augmentation for warfare is considered a fait accompli by the authors.

We can assume that although this report is coming from the UK Ministry of Defense, and German Federal Ministry of Defense, parallel efforts are being made by most large governments around the world,” mRNA inventor dr Robert Malone warned.

“Future wars will be won, not by those with the most advanced technology, but by those who can most effectively integrate the unique capabilities of both people and machines,” according to the report. The ethics of human augmentation is therefore viewed as an impediment by the likes of the WEF and the military-industrial complex.